/page/2
Tonight my daughter selected the traditional take on the story ofThe Three Bears for her bedtime story, and I wished instead that we still hadGoldie and the Three Bears checked out from the library. Not only does Goldie have curly hair like Annabel, she also doesn’t like it when her swing is pushed too high, or when her bath water is too cold. She likes things just right according to her own particular likes and dislikes, which is something that holds true for just about everyone on the face of the planet but is especially pronounced in children, I think. No crusts, no peanut chunks in her peanut butter, and a sandwich cut on the diagonal-that is certainly something that my daughter and I can both identify with from our respective roles. As can so many other parents and children, I’m sure.Another likable aspect of this modern retelling is that the story does not end with “and she ran away and never again entered the woods.” That sort of “lesson” or mentality is not something I wish to instill in my not quite 3 year old. While it’s wise to be wary of strangers, I’m much more keen on Diane Stanley’s version which has Goldie befriend the wee bear in the end. She just so happens to have tastes that run similar to Goldie’s, and they become playmates and good friends, fur and all. The pictures in the book are sweet and fresh. This adaptation is a welcome new take on the old, stale classic. Diane Stanley trims all of the fear and “oh dear“‘s from her tale and embellishes the bare bones of the tale with revelatory PBJ, understanding, and friendship. Five stars for sure.

Tonight my daughter selected the traditional take on the story ofThe Three Bears for her bedtime story, and I wished instead that we still hadGoldie and the Three Bears checked out from the library. Not only does Goldie have curly hair like Annabel, she also doesn’t like it when her swing is pushed too high, or when her bath water is too cold. She likes things just right according to her own particular likes and dislikes, which is something that holds true for just about everyone on the face of the planet but is especially pronounced in children, I think. No crusts, no peanut chunks in her peanut butter, and a sandwich cut on the diagonal-that is certainly something that my daughter and I can both identify with from our respective roles. As can so many other parents and children, I’m sure.

Another likable aspect of this modern retelling is that the story does not end with “and she ran away and never again entered the woods.” That sort of “lesson” or mentality is not something I wish to instill in my not quite 3 year old. While it’s wise to be wary of strangers, I’m much more keen on Diane Stanley’s version which has Goldie befriend the wee bear in the end. She just so happens to have tastes that run similar to Goldie’s, and they become playmates and good friends, fur and all. 

The pictures in the book are sweet and fresh. This adaptation is a welcome new take on the old, stale classic. Diane Stanley trims all of the fear and “oh dear“‘s from her tale and embellishes the bare bones of the tale with revelatory PBJ, understanding, and friendship. Five stars for sure.

5 out of 5 stars.
As a child, I always loved a book with two narratives to follow, observing how the plot and subplot intermingled and influenced each other. Most Perfect Spot, written and illustrated by Diane Goode, the Caldecott-winning illustrator of When I Was Young in the Mountains, is comprised of two tales and an amusing dose of dramatic irony.  The story is set in the early 20th century in Brooklyn.  The watercolor illustrations are sweet and old timey and match the mood of this delightful book.

5 out of 5 stars.

As a child, I always loved a book with two narratives to follow, observing how the plot and subplot intermingled and influenced each other. Most Perfect Spot, written and illustrated by Diane Goode, the Caldecott-winning illustrator of When I Was Young in the Mountains, is comprised of two tales and an amusing dose of dramatic irony.  The story is set in the early 20th century in Brooklyn.  The watercolor illustrations are sweet and old timey and match the mood of this delightful book.

in the interest of keeping this up, i’m going to ease back into book reviews using a star system and limiting the review to a few words. so:
5/5 stars or *****
gorilla! kitten! friendship! emotions! floral upholstery! beautiful style and illustrations! sweet message! and hidden faces in roses!

in the interest of keeping this up, i’m going to ease back into book reviews using a star system and limiting the review to a few words. so:

5/5 stars or *****

gorilla! kitten! friendship! emotions! floral upholstery! beautiful style and illustrations! sweet message! and hidden faces in roses!

On nights when I’m stretched for time, but still wish to write a blurb about a beloved book, I turn to my stash of board books. And I would be remiss not to include an Eric Carle picture book among my first twenty posts. Add Bill Martin Jr. taking care of the words, and what do you get? A brown bear, red bird, yellow duck, green frog… Yes, the classic Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See?
I’m not sure if this picture book was written with the intent to be sung, but I have never been able to read it without adding a musical lilt to the words. Or peppering it with animal sounds, especially if someone is especially squirmy or sleepy-eyed.  I would read this to my daughter when she was wee as a bedtime story. It is one of a number of books that will always bring her babyhood to mind.Eric Carle’s signature tissue paper collage is beautiful as always. After writing a number of these reviews, I’m finding that I’m especially drawn to collage-style illustrations. And Carle is certainly a king among collage artists. This book is a classic and ought to be on every child’s bookshelf, well-worn and much-loved.

On nights when I’m stretched for time, but still wish to write a blurb about a beloved book, I turn to my stash of board books. 

And I would be remiss not to include an Eric Carle picture book among my first twenty posts. Add Bill Martin Jr. taking care of the words, and what do you get? 

A brown bear, red bird, yellow duck, green frog… Yes, the classic Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See?

I’m not sure if this picture book was written with the intent to be sung, but I have never been able to read it without adding a musical lilt to the words. Or peppering it with animal sounds, especially if someone is especially squirmy or sleepy-eyed.  I would read this to my daughter when she was wee as a bedtime story. It is one of a number of books that will always bring her babyhood to mind.

Eric Carle’s signature tissue paper collage is beautiful as always. After writing a number of these reviews, I’m finding that I’m especially drawn to collage-style illustrations. And Carle is certainly a king among collage artists. 

This book is a classic and ought to be on every child’s bookshelf, well-worn and much-loved.

The powerful message of this optimistic book, intended for toddlers, is ageless.
Told simply through the stories of squirrel, bird, fox, and dog, who suffer various losses and pitfalls, the message that an unfortunate situation can improve hinges on a simple, decisive “but then…”.  Mindful living, a buoyant spirit-these are the qualities that will turn bad into good.
As a mother, what I take away from the book is that there will be meltdowns, for example, but they should not, need not, dictate the course of the day. The story perfectly complements mothering at its best.
And it doesn’t always take a larger nut, in the case of squirrel, to turn the day around-it could simply mean having a greater appreciation for the small, everyday things we take for granted, or surprising someone to an unexpected treat. Or giving extra hugs.
Making a determined, honest effort to turn a “bad day” into a good day is an invaluable lesson that even the oldest among us  will appreciate.

The powerful message of this optimistic book, intended for toddlers, is ageless.

Told simply through the stories of squirrel, bird, fox, and dog, who suffer various losses and pitfalls, the message that an unfortunate situation can improve hinges on a simple, decisive “but then…”. Mindful living, a buoyant spirit-these are the qualities that will turn bad into good.

As a mother, what I take away from the book is that there will be meltdowns, for example, but they should not, need not, dictate the course of the day. The story perfectly complements mothering at its best.

And it doesn’t always take a larger nut, in the case of squirrel, to turn the day around-it could simply mean having a greater appreciation for the small, everyday things we take for granted, or surprising someone to an unexpected treat. Or giving extra hugs.

Making a determined, honest effort to turn a “bad day” into a good day is an invaluable lesson that even the oldest among us will appreciate.

There is much to love about this book.
Firstly, the subject matter: matryoshkas- Russian nesting dolls!
Second, they pop out of the book and can be played with! And then put back inside as a puzzle.
Third, the illustrations are delightful, from the eye-catching patterns on their shawls to their sweet pink cheeks.  I love them as individuals.
Fourth, this book introduces children to the Eastern European palate-cabbage, beets, apple dumplings. How do you say “yum” in Russian?
Fifth and finally, the text is very simple and rhythmic. One food is shared on Monday, another on Tuesday. All you hungry little matryoshkas, come and eat it up!
My Little Matroyoshkas is inventive, fun, and eye-opening. And, as a bonus, it’s quite pretty as well thanks to Tanya Roitman’s artistic talents.

There is much to love about this book.

Firstly, the subject matter: matryoshkas- Russian nesting dolls!

Second, they pop out of the book and can be played with! And then put back inside as a puzzle.

Third, the illustrations are delightful, from the eye-catching patterns on their shawls to their sweet pink cheeks.  I love them as individuals.

Fourth, this book introduces children to the Eastern European palate-cabbage, beets, apple dumplings. How do you say “yum” in Russian?

Fifth and finally, the text is very simple and rhythmic. One food is shared on Monday, another on Tuesday. All you hungry little matryoshkas, come and eat it up!

My Little Matroyoshkas is inventive, fun, and eye-opening. And, as a bonus, it’s quite pretty as well thanks to Tanya Roitman’s artistic talents.

Sometime last week Annabel decided she would take over the matter of picking out her clothing and, even more importantly, that she would no longer require my help when pulling on her pants or finding her way through a shirt. Every morning she carries her bathroom stool over to her dresser and peers into the top drawer containing shirts, socks, and pants.  She will pull out various articles that are to her liking and arrange them on the floor: one sock placed beneath each pant leg and a shirt above the pants, just so.  It is quite sweet, but bittersweet for me as well.  She has always had a choice between this and that, but maybe Daisy Gets Dressed inspired her to take matters of the wardrobe- the picking, choosing, and dressing-entirely upon herself.
This rhyming story is a unique visual delight.  Instead of your run-of-the-mill watercolor or pen and ink, Clare Beaton uses fabric, thread, beads- all manner of textiles, really- to create a memorable seek-and-find book.  Where can Daisy’s skirt be?, and how many wavy things can you see? Along with the skirt decked out in ric rac, an octopus, spaghetti, and a wriggly snake are stitched onto the page.
The book continues on in this manner with successive pages devoted to striped, starry, and swirly patterns, to name a few. When it’s all said and done, Daisy is decked out in an eye-catching ensemble, from boots to umbrella.
Daisy Gets Dressed is part how-to, part seek-and-find, part pattern recognition, and wholly delightful.

Sometime last week Annabel decided she would take over the matter of picking out her clothing and, even more importantly, that she would no longer require my help when pulling on her pants or finding her way through a shirt. Every morning she carries her bathroom stool over to her dresser and peers into the top drawer containing shirts, socks, and pants.  She will pull out various articles that are to her liking and arrange them on the floor: one sock placed beneath each pant leg and a shirt above the pants, just so.  It is quite sweet, but bittersweet for me as well.  She has always had a choice between this and that, but maybe Daisy Gets Dressed inspired her to take matters of the wardrobe- the picking, choosing, and dressing-entirely upon herself.

This rhyming story is a unique visual delight.  Instead of your run-of-the-mill watercolor or pen and ink, Clare Beaton uses fabric, thread, beads- all manner of textiles, really- to create a memorable seek-and-find book.  Where can Daisy’s skirt be?, and how many wavy things can you see? Along with the skirt decked out in ric rac, an octopus, spaghetti, and a wriggly snake are stitched onto the page.

The book continues on in this manner with successive pages devoted to striped, starry, and swirly patterns, to name a few. When it’s all said and done, Daisy is decked out in an eye-catching ensemble, from boots to umbrella.

Daisy Gets Dressed is part how-to, part seek-and-find, part pattern recognition, and wholly delightful.

It was my birthday yesterday.  We celebrated with vegan carrot cake, but I would have been touched if my little frog-loving Annabel had surprised me with a mud pie cake as the green protagonist does in Froggy Bakes A Cake.
Froggy happens to be a very do-it-yourself frog who wants to make his mother’s birthday cake all by himself, something any toddler can appreciate.
The language used in the story is pure fun- onomatopoeia abounds. Flop, flop, flopping, glubbing, blupping, plopping, and one final big shloop seals the fate of the cake.  Annabel enjoys the fun little song Froggy sings that goes something like this: Oogelly boogelly burbly bake. I make and I bake and I wait for the cake.
This fun book, one of many in a series, is filled with likable characters and colorful language. And mud pie!

It was my birthday yesterday.  We celebrated with vegan carrot cake, but I would have been touched if my little frog-loving Annabel had surprised me with a mud pie cake as the green protagonist does in Froggy Bakes A Cake.

Froggy happens to be a very do-it-yourself frog who wants to make his mother’s birthday cake all by himself, something any toddler can appreciate.

The language used in the story is pure fun- onomatopoeia abounds. Flop, flop, flopping, glubbing, blupping, plopping, and one final big shloop seals the fate of the cake.  Annabel enjoys the fun little song Froggy sings that goes something like this: Oogelly boogelly burbly bake. I make and I bake and I wait for the cake.

This fun book, one of many in a series, is filled with likable characters and colorful language. And mud pie!

I’ve thought long and hard about my favorite Sandra Boynton book; I’ve chosen Doggies.
True, I love the rhythm and cadence of Barnyard Dance, the silly turkey in Red Hat, Blue Hat, and those party-loving hippos of Hippos Go Berserk.  But Doggies it is.
Why?
Well, maybe it is for the purely sentimental reason that this board book was one of my daughter’s first.  Or, perhaps it is because I enjoy the chance to sound like a dog ten different ways.
It is uncanny how accurate she has managed to match up specific barks with particular breeds of dog.  I suppose it only takes a little research and observation, but I remain in awe. “Ar-roof!” says the Afghan dog seven times, and I buy it.  ”Ruff ruff, ruff ruff” says a perky shepherd, and I nod, yes: the bark fits the dog.
If you’re willing to woof and yap your way through the entire book, a total of 33 barks plus a howling session, thank you, then you really are due for a treat of some sort.  Of course, there is no better prize than a child’s admiration and giggles at the story’s end, but I wouldn’t pass up a glass of water after all of that doggie fun.

I’ve thought long and hard about my favorite Sandra Boynton book; I’ve chosen Doggies.

True, I love the rhythm and cadence of Barnyard Dance, the silly turkey in Red Hat, Blue Hat, and those party-loving hippos of Hippos Go Berserk.  But Doggies it is.

Why?

Well, maybe it is for the purely sentimental reason that this board book was one of my daughter’s first.  Or, perhaps it is because I enjoy the chance to sound like a dog ten different ways.

It is uncanny how accurate she has managed to match up specific barks with particular breeds of dog.  I suppose it only takes a little research and observation, but I remain in awe. “Ar-roof!” says the Afghan dog seven times, and I buy it.  ”Ruff ruff, ruff ruff” says a perky shepherd, and I nod, yes: the bark fits the dog.

If you’re willing to woof and yap your way through the entire book, a total of 33 barks plus a howling session, thank you, then you really are due for a treat of some sort.  Of course, there is no better prize than a child’s admiration and giggles at the story’s end, but I wouldn’t pass up a glass of water after all of that doggie fun.

To put it plainly, sometimes all you really want it eye candy.  And Ida Pearle delivers. Page after page of her beautiful collages dazzle the viewer, er, reader.

What, you say? People are lovely and all, but you’d rather gaze at an alphabetical array of animals?

Okay. Then Charley Harper is surely your man. His sturdy little board book is chock full of graphic depictions ranging from blue crab to shaggy yak.

And if you have a little person who has graduated beyond the board book, check out Animalia. It is breathtaking.

If Ida Pearle’s book is a licorice allsort, and Charley Harper’s is a peppermint swirl, then Graeme Base’s picture book is definitely a true-to-life, sparkly marzipan fruit.

Delicious reads, all three.

Tonight my daughter selected the traditional take on the story ofThe Three Bears for her bedtime story, and I wished instead that we still hadGoldie and the Three Bears checked out from the library. Not only does Goldie have curly hair like Annabel, she also doesn’t like it when her swing is pushed too high, or when her bath water is too cold. She likes things just right according to her own particular likes and dislikes, which is something that holds true for just about everyone on the face of the planet but is especially pronounced in children, I think. No crusts, no peanut chunks in her peanut butter, and a sandwich cut on the diagonal-that is certainly something that my daughter and I can both identify with from our respective roles. As can so many other parents and children, I’m sure.Another likable aspect of this modern retelling is that the story does not end with “and she ran away and never again entered the woods.” That sort of “lesson” or mentality is not something I wish to instill in my not quite 3 year old. While it’s wise to be wary of strangers, I’m much more keen on Diane Stanley’s version which has Goldie befriend the wee bear in the end. She just so happens to have tastes that run similar to Goldie’s, and they become playmates and good friends, fur and all. The pictures in the book are sweet and fresh. This adaptation is a welcome new take on the old, stale classic. Diane Stanley trims all of the fear and “oh dear“‘s from her tale and embellishes the bare bones of the tale with revelatory PBJ, understanding, and friendship. Five stars for sure.

Tonight my daughter selected the traditional take on the story ofThe Three Bears for her bedtime story, and I wished instead that we still hadGoldie and the Three Bears checked out from the library. Not only does Goldie have curly hair like Annabel, she also doesn’t like it when her swing is pushed too high, or when her bath water is too cold. She likes things just right according to her own particular likes and dislikes, which is something that holds true for just about everyone on the face of the planet but is especially pronounced in children, I think. No crusts, no peanut chunks in her peanut butter, and a sandwich cut on the diagonal-that is certainly something that my daughter and I can both identify with from our respective roles. As can so many other parents and children, I’m sure.

Another likable aspect of this modern retelling is that the story does not end with “and she ran away and never again entered the woods.” That sort of “lesson” or mentality is not something I wish to instill in my not quite 3 year old. While it’s wise to be wary of strangers, I’m much more keen on Diane Stanley’s version which has Goldie befriend the wee bear in the end. She just so happens to have tastes that run similar to Goldie’s, and they become playmates and good friends, fur and all. 

The pictures in the book are sweet and fresh. This adaptation is a welcome new take on the old, stale classic. Diane Stanley trims all of the fear and “oh dear“‘s from her tale and embellishes the bare bones of the tale with revelatory PBJ, understanding, and friendship. Five stars for sure.

5 out of 5 stars.
As a child, I always loved a book with two narratives to follow, observing how the plot and subplot intermingled and influenced each other. Most Perfect Spot, written and illustrated by Diane Goode, the Caldecott-winning illustrator of When I Was Young in the Mountains, is comprised of two tales and an amusing dose of dramatic irony.  The story is set in the early 20th century in Brooklyn.  The watercolor illustrations are sweet and old timey and match the mood of this delightful book.

5 out of 5 stars.

As a child, I always loved a book with two narratives to follow, observing how the plot and subplot intermingled and influenced each other. Most Perfect Spot, written and illustrated by Diane Goode, the Caldecott-winning illustrator of When I Was Young in the Mountains, is comprised of two tales and an amusing dose of dramatic irony.  The story is set in the early 20th century in Brooklyn.  The watercolor illustrations are sweet and old timey and match the mood of this delightful book.

in the interest of keeping this up, i’m going to ease back into book reviews using a star system and limiting the review to a few words. so:
5/5 stars or *****
gorilla! kitten! friendship! emotions! floral upholstery! beautiful style and illustrations! sweet message! and hidden faces in roses!

in the interest of keeping this up, i’m going to ease back into book reviews using a star system and limiting the review to a few words. so:

5/5 stars or *****

gorilla! kitten! friendship! emotions! floral upholstery! beautiful style and illustrations! sweet message! and hidden faces in roses!

On nights when I’m stretched for time, but still wish to write a blurb about a beloved book, I turn to my stash of board books. And I would be remiss not to include an Eric Carle picture book among my first twenty posts. Add Bill Martin Jr. taking care of the words, and what do you get? A brown bear, red bird, yellow duck, green frog… Yes, the classic Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See?
I’m not sure if this picture book was written with the intent to be sung, but I have never been able to read it without adding a musical lilt to the words. Or peppering it with animal sounds, especially if someone is especially squirmy or sleepy-eyed.  I would read this to my daughter when she was wee as a bedtime story. It is one of a number of books that will always bring her babyhood to mind.Eric Carle’s signature tissue paper collage is beautiful as always. After writing a number of these reviews, I’m finding that I’m especially drawn to collage-style illustrations. And Carle is certainly a king among collage artists. This book is a classic and ought to be on every child’s bookshelf, well-worn and much-loved.

On nights when I’m stretched for time, but still wish to write a blurb about a beloved book, I turn to my stash of board books. 

And I would be remiss not to include an Eric Carle picture book among my first twenty posts. Add Bill Martin Jr. taking care of the words, and what do you get? 

A brown bear, red bird, yellow duck, green frog… Yes, the classic Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See?

I’m not sure if this picture book was written with the intent to be sung, but I have never been able to read it without adding a musical lilt to the words. Or peppering it with animal sounds, especially if someone is especially squirmy or sleepy-eyed.  I would read this to my daughter when she was wee as a bedtime story. It is one of a number of books that will always bring her babyhood to mind.

Eric Carle’s signature tissue paper collage is beautiful as always. After writing a number of these reviews, I’m finding that I’m especially drawn to collage-style illustrations. And Carle is certainly a king among collage artists. 

This book is a classic and ought to be on every child’s bookshelf, well-worn and much-loved.

The powerful message of this optimistic book, intended for toddlers, is ageless.
Told simply through the stories of squirrel, bird, fox, and dog, who suffer various losses and pitfalls, the message that an unfortunate situation can improve hinges on a simple, decisive “but then…”.  Mindful living, a buoyant spirit-these are the qualities that will turn bad into good.
As a mother, what I take away from the book is that there will be meltdowns, for example, but they should not, need not, dictate the course of the day. The story perfectly complements mothering at its best.
And it doesn’t always take a larger nut, in the case of squirrel, to turn the day around-it could simply mean having a greater appreciation for the small, everyday things we take for granted, or surprising someone to an unexpected treat. Or giving extra hugs.
Making a determined, honest effort to turn a “bad day” into a good day is an invaluable lesson that even the oldest among us  will appreciate.

The powerful message of this optimistic book, intended for toddlers, is ageless.

Told simply through the stories of squirrel, bird, fox, and dog, who suffer various losses and pitfalls, the message that an unfortunate situation can improve hinges on a simple, decisive “but then…”. Mindful living, a buoyant spirit-these are the qualities that will turn bad into good.

As a mother, what I take away from the book is that there will be meltdowns, for example, but they should not, need not, dictate the course of the day. The story perfectly complements mothering at its best.

And it doesn’t always take a larger nut, in the case of squirrel, to turn the day around-it could simply mean having a greater appreciation for the small, everyday things we take for granted, or surprising someone to an unexpected treat. Or giving extra hugs.

Making a determined, honest effort to turn a “bad day” into a good day is an invaluable lesson that even the oldest among us will appreciate.

There is much to love about this book.
Firstly, the subject matter: matryoshkas- Russian nesting dolls!
Second, they pop out of the book and can be played with! And then put back inside as a puzzle.
Third, the illustrations are delightful, from the eye-catching patterns on their shawls to their sweet pink cheeks.  I love them as individuals.
Fourth, this book introduces children to the Eastern European palate-cabbage, beets, apple dumplings. How do you say “yum” in Russian?
Fifth and finally, the text is very simple and rhythmic. One food is shared on Monday, another on Tuesday. All you hungry little matryoshkas, come and eat it up!
My Little Matroyoshkas is inventive, fun, and eye-opening. And, as a bonus, it’s quite pretty as well thanks to Tanya Roitman’s artistic talents.

There is much to love about this book.

Firstly, the subject matter: matryoshkas- Russian nesting dolls!

Second, they pop out of the book and can be played with! And then put back inside as a puzzle.

Third, the illustrations are delightful, from the eye-catching patterns on their shawls to their sweet pink cheeks.  I love them as individuals.

Fourth, this book introduces children to the Eastern European palate-cabbage, beets, apple dumplings. How do you say “yum” in Russian?

Fifth and finally, the text is very simple and rhythmic. One food is shared on Monday, another on Tuesday. All you hungry little matryoshkas, come and eat it up!

My Little Matroyoshkas is inventive, fun, and eye-opening. And, as a bonus, it’s quite pretty as well thanks to Tanya Roitman’s artistic talents.

Sometime last week Annabel decided she would take over the matter of picking out her clothing and, even more importantly, that she would no longer require my help when pulling on her pants or finding her way through a shirt. Every morning she carries her bathroom stool over to her dresser and peers into the top drawer containing shirts, socks, and pants.  She will pull out various articles that are to her liking and arrange them on the floor: one sock placed beneath each pant leg and a shirt above the pants, just so.  It is quite sweet, but bittersweet for me as well.  She has always had a choice between this and that, but maybe Daisy Gets Dressed inspired her to take matters of the wardrobe- the picking, choosing, and dressing-entirely upon herself.
This rhyming story is a unique visual delight.  Instead of your run-of-the-mill watercolor or pen and ink, Clare Beaton uses fabric, thread, beads- all manner of textiles, really- to create a memorable seek-and-find book.  Where can Daisy’s skirt be?, and how many wavy things can you see? Along with the skirt decked out in ric rac, an octopus, spaghetti, and a wriggly snake are stitched onto the page.
The book continues on in this manner with successive pages devoted to striped, starry, and swirly patterns, to name a few. When it’s all said and done, Daisy is decked out in an eye-catching ensemble, from boots to umbrella.
Daisy Gets Dressed is part how-to, part seek-and-find, part pattern recognition, and wholly delightful.

Sometime last week Annabel decided she would take over the matter of picking out her clothing and, even more importantly, that she would no longer require my help when pulling on her pants or finding her way through a shirt. Every morning she carries her bathroom stool over to her dresser and peers into the top drawer containing shirts, socks, and pants.  She will pull out various articles that are to her liking and arrange them on the floor: one sock placed beneath each pant leg and a shirt above the pants, just so.  It is quite sweet, but bittersweet for me as well.  She has always had a choice between this and that, but maybe Daisy Gets Dressed inspired her to take matters of the wardrobe- the picking, choosing, and dressing-entirely upon herself.

This rhyming story is a unique visual delight.  Instead of your run-of-the-mill watercolor or pen and ink, Clare Beaton uses fabric, thread, beads- all manner of textiles, really- to create a memorable seek-and-find book.  Where can Daisy’s skirt be?, and how many wavy things can you see? Along with the skirt decked out in ric rac, an octopus, spaghetti, and a wriggly snake are stitched onto the page.

The book continues on in this manner with successive pages devoted to striped, starry, and swirly patterns, to name a few. When it’s all said and done, Daisy is decked out in an eye-catching ensemble, from boots to umbrella.

Daisy Gets Dressed is part how-to, part seek-and-find, part pattern recognition, and wholly delightful.

It was my birthday yesterday.  We celebrated with vegan carrot cake, but I would have been touched if my little frog-loving Annabel had surprised me with a mud pie cake as the green protagonist does in Froggy Bakes A Cake.
Froggy happens to be a very do-it-yourself frog who wants to make his mother’s birthday cake all by himself, something any toddler can appreciate.
The language used in the story is pure fun- onomatopoeia abounds. Flop, flop, flopping, glubbing, blupping, plopping, and one final big shloop seals the fate of the cake.  Annabel enjoys the fun little song Froggy sings that goes something like this: Oogelly boogelly burbly bake. I make and I bake and I wait for the cake.
This fun book, one of many in a series, is filled with likable characters and colorful language. And mud pie!

It was my birthday yesterday.  We celebrated with vegan carrot cake, but I would have been touched if my little frog-loving Annabel had surprised me with a mud pie cake as the green protagonist does in Froggy Bakes A Cake.

Froggy happens to be a very do-it-yourself frog who wants to make his mother’s birthday cake all by himself, something any toddler can appreciate.

The language used in the story is pure fun- onomatopoeia abounds. Flop, flop, flopping, glubbing, blupping, plopping, and one final big shloop seals the fate of the cake.  Annabel enjoys the fun little song Froggy sings that goes something like this: Oogelly boogelly burbly bake. I make and I bake and I wait for the cake.

This fun book, one of many in a series, is filled with likable characters and colorful language. And mud pie!

I’ve thought long and hard about my favorite Sandra Boynton book; I’ve chosen Doggies.
True, I love the rhythm and cadence of Barnyard Dance, the silly turkey in Red Hat, Blue Hat, and those party-loving hippos of Hippos Go Berserk.  But Doggies it is.
Why?
Well, maybe it is for the purely sentimental reason that this board book was one of my daughter’s first.  Or, perhaps it is because I enjoy the chance to sound like a dog ten different ways.
It is uncanny how accurate she has managed to match up specific barks with particular breeds of dog.  I suppose it only takes a little research and observation, but I remain in awe. “Ar-roof!” says the Afghan dog seven times, and I buy it.  ”Ruff ruff, ruff ruff” says a perky shepherd, and I nod, yes: the bark fits the dog.
If you’re willing to woof and yap your way through the entire book, a total of 33 barks plus a howling session, thank you, then you really are due for a treat of some sort.  Of course, there is no better prize than a child’s admiration and giggles at the story’s end, but I wouldn’t pass up a glass of water after all of that doggie fun.

I’ve thought long and hard about my favorite Sandra Boynton book; I’ve chosen Doggies.

True, I love the rhythm and cadence of Barnyard Dance, the silly turkey in Red Hat, Blue Hat, and those party-loving hippos of Hippos Go Berserk.  But Doggies it is.

Why?

Well, maybe it is for the purely sentimental reason that this board book was one of my daughter’s first.  Or, perhaps it is because I enjoy the chance to sound like a dog ten different ways.

It is uncanny how accurate she has managed to match up specific barks with particular breeds of dog.  I suppose it only takes a little research and observation, but I remain in awe. “Ar-roof!” says the Afghan dog seven times, and I buy it.  ”Ruff ruff, ruff ruff” says a perky shepherd, and I nod, yes: the bark fits the dog.

If you’re willing to woof and yap your way through the entire book, a total of 33 barks plus a howling session, thank you, then you really are due for a treat of some sort.  Of course, there is no better prize than a child’s admiration and giggles at the story’s end, but I wouldn’t pass up a glass of water after all of that doggie fun.

To put it plainly, sometimes all you really want it eye candy.  And Ida Pearle delivers. Page after page of her beautiful collages dazzle the viewer, er, reader.

What, you say? People are lovely and all, but you’d rather gaze at an alphabetical array of animals?

Okay. Then Charley Harper is surely your man. His sturdy little board book is chock full of graphic depictions ranging from blue crab to shaggy yak.

And if you have a little person who has graduated beyond the board book, check out Animalia. It is breathtaking.

If Ida Pearle’s book is a licorice allsort, and Charley Harper’s is a peppermint swirl, then Graeme Base’s picture book is definitely a true-to-life, sparkly marzipan fruit.

Delicious reads, all three.

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